It turns out that men are the ones who can have it all.

A female executive banker has a good cry about how horrible it is to face the reality of being one of those high-powered career women. You know; the strong and independent ones. Her big complaint is that her male colleagues are making her infertile. How is this possible, a perfectly reasonable and sane person might wonder.

Let’s find out.

When you’re a woman in your mid-30s, fertility is not a given. If you’re working 80 hours a week and are exhausted, conceiving a child doesn’t necessarily happen as easily as you might think. I know, and I am not the only one to have this problem. For women in finance, the heavy workload, the high stress and the lack of sleep not only make it difficult to find a partner, but are a recipe for hormonal imbalance and infertility. The longer I work in banking, the more that I feel that I’m being made to make a choice: the ability to conceive, or the opportunity to become an MD.

The conception part is actually not that hard; you sleep with someone a few times. The bolded part is her real problem. She of course fell for the lie that women can have it all. She chose the high powered banking career, she is a VP after all, and is now bewildered to discover that being a VP has exactly zero effect on attracting men. But then again, we know that men are attracted to youth and beauty, not careers and power.

A heavy workload, high stress, and lack of sleep in a woman translates into one thing and one thing only – a strung out hysterical bitch that no sane man would want anything to do with.

My male colleagues don’t have this dilemma. Not only are they able to have children easily (often with women who work outside banking) but their ability to start families is making it even harder for female bankers like me to do the same.

This woman is amazed that there exists people who work outside banking. One presumes that she was searching for her conception vehicle within the walls of where she works. Unable to talk one of her co-workers into hooking up, she is now bitter that her male colleagues are somehow finding the time and energy to have families.

Heads up chicky-babes; men have been juggling these two responsibilities since like forever.

Men and women are not the same. Women can and will work as hard as men, but doing so often comes at a tangible physical cost. This is why a lot of the senior women in banking are childless. By comparison, most of the men in banking have children. Some women in banking choose not to have children, but for a lot of women it’s forced upon them. Men in banking need to be more sensitive to this – and to stop crowing about their children and expecting childless female colleagues to pick up the slack when they start dumping work on them and taking extra time off.

And here we see laid bare the most ironic fact of all; it turns out that the ones who can have it all are men. We get the careers and we get to have children as well. I mean, seriously heads explode stuff right here, folks.

Sorry, not sorry.

35 thoughts on “It turns out that men are the ones who can have it all.

  1. earl

    ‘Men in banking need to be more sensitive to this – ‘

    I’d retort…why?

    Why do men have to be sensitive to the choices women made? Even if childlessness was ‘forced’ upon her…it’s because she decide a career was more important. I’m not going to be sensitive to the fact her ovaries are crying.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Nick Mgtow

      Oh, she wants compassion from her male colleagues like she’d get with her female friends?

      “You can’t have kids? Oh, that’s so sad! Poor kitty”

      She wants someone to pity her! Those men are wise! I presume they didn’t tell her it was her lifestyle in her way of having kids (stress and her age) that compromised her success in her quest to motherhood.
      If they had told her, she’d complain or their mansplaining.

      They listen but don’t say anything, they’re uncaring. Damned if you do, damned if you don’t. Women aren’t looking for solutions but sympathy!

      Like

      1. earl

        ‘ Women aren’t looking for solutions but sympathy!’

        It’s like they keep expecting men to act like women and then get upset when they don’t. They only way a man acts like a woman is if every bit of masculinity has been beaten out of the guy and he’s nothing more than simps. Or he was raised by a single mother.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Nick Mgtow

      A “career” is just a fancy name for men trying to feed, clothe and shelter their family.

      Karen Straughan said something very similar. Feminists view family as an obstacle to a career. Men view career as a way to get a family”

      Like

  2. TechieDude

    Good lord….

    I’ve had many customers that were banks in my career. So first off, a “VP” at a bank is nothing. There are an astonishing number of “VPs” in any given large bank that in most companies would be “Director” or “Manager”.

    And I’ll agree with her to some degree, stress makes it harder to conceive. But that’s her problem, as is her dearth of suitable mates. But look at what she’s asking. Her peers should be more sensitive? I’ll echo Earl above and ask Why?

    Should her guy peers do a Damore and send a memo that women would flourish in banking if we catered to their needs to find a mate and have a kid, because they are different? Contemplate the catch-22 there.

    I was sitting in my office way back when with my boss and a female director, who was trying hard as hell to have a kid, and spending tons of dough to do so. Her line was epic “Here I am, breaking my ass to have a child and you two slobs have beautiful kids with no effort whatsoever. No offense”.

    None taken. I saw it as a compliment.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. TechieDude

      Her problem is envy, pure an simple.

      I’m sure her peers have the exact same time off / family leave benefits she enjoys. She’s envious because they use them?

      And I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had peers in other departments, men and women, whose workloads grow because a woman went on maternity leave, and worse yet, waited to the end of it to quit.

      BTW how does this all square with the related article under her post – “Taking paternity leave the ‘kiss of death’ for bankers”

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Red Pill Wisdom

    “When you’re a woman in your mid-30s, fertility is not a given. If you’re working 80 hours a week and are exhausted, conceiving a child doesn’t necessarily happen as easily as you might think. I know, and I am not the only one to have this problem…”

    Being on the ‘wrong side’ of twenty-six or twenty-seven (the peak age of a woman’s fertility) doesn’t help any. But of course, it also doesn’t help any that women DON’T WANT TO HEAR THAT FACT when they’re that age, either. I suppose it’s because that each and every one of them thinks that SHE is the ‘exceptional snowflake’ to whom that fact doesn’t apply.
    At the same time, I can’t help but think of how many men she dumped or rejected by the time that she was in her mid-twenties, all because he didn’t have ‘the right car’, ‘the right job’, ‘the right clothes’, or even ‘the right haircut’.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. earl

      Yes it appears men are getting fed up with women blaming them for the choices they willingly made.

      We should just go back to oppressing them…because it appears liberating them has made them more unhappy.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. “…We should just go back to oppressing them…because it appears liberating them has made them more unhappy.”

        The only problem with that is, that they’ve made having any contact with them to be more trouble and aggravation than what they’re worth; the Hell with ’em.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Someone

    That woman’s article made me feel so sad for her. It’s so tough having a vagina these days. How does she make it through the day?

    I’m still waiting for this equality to kick in where the woman has a decent job and the man can stay at home if he likes. Until then, educating most women is waste of resources and women’s suffrage needs to be repealed.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Hmm
    Difficulty in finding a partner is self explanatory.
    Difficulty in conceiving sounds like she’s been trying to get pregnant from the hook ups / short term relationships that she can get, and failing.

    She is telling the men that she’s trying to get pregnant, isn’t she?

    Like

  6. Phil B

    Men in banking need to be more sensitive to this – and to stop crowing about their children and expecting childless female colleagues to pick up the slack when they start dumping work on them and taking extra time off.

    Let me gather my thoughts on this …

    Bwahahahahahahahahahaha!

    OK, sorry. Let me try again.

    I have noted throughout my working life that it is the women that do this, not men. Men are NOT obsessed with their offspring. School holiday times are reserved for women with children and they have priority when it comes to booking time off because of the children, of course.

    That and the persistent lateness because they were taking Tarquin or Jemima to school and leaving early at random times because Tarquin or jemima needed to go to ballet classes, the gymkhana or because they were ill or whatever and the continual discussions about their children. I was under the delusion that an employer paid you to work for them from 9 to 5 or the equivalent. Apparently not with women of childbearing age where The Children trump card is played frequently.

    I know several women who don’t have children that resent their children first attitude and are fed up with having to cover for them.

    I would never employ a woman under 45 and would have grave reservations employing one over that age too.

    Like

    1. Chris

      You are right Phil B. men are generally not giving to “crowing” about their children or to taking excessive time off to attend to them.

      She’s apparently hypersensitive whenever her male colleagues make any mention whatsoever of their children. Why the men? I’m guessing because she’s jealous none of them have picked her to marry. That line about “often with women who work outside banking” also suggests this.

      But isn’t this supposed to be a good thing according to feminists right? Workplaces are supposed to be completely platonic right? She should be happy none of her colleagues are sexually harassing her for dates.

      Like

      1. Nick Mgtow

        Oh No! Like Dalrock wrote about ” inexhaustible supply of good will from men”, feminists are entitled to quotas to have high status roles, and at the same time enough high status men to go after them, and at the same time whoring around, and at the same time have men willing to marry her when she’s done whoring, and at the same time she wants her colleagues to hit on her, but at the same time she wants her colleagues to be professional and not harassers…

        Like

  7. Pingback: An unshakable faith in men’s benevolence. An inexhaustible supply of good will from men. | Dalrock

  8. mer

    “…and expecting childless female colleagues to pick up the slack when they start dumping work on them and taking extra time off.”

    Not in banking, but engineering and as a male, I’ve been doing this for almost my whole career.

    Like

  9. Confused by this:

    “Some women in banking choose not to have children, but for a lot of women it’s forced upon them.”

    Wait, what? Forced? To quote Enigo Montoya, “I do not think that word means what you think it means”.

    Like

  10. Pingback: Late Night With In The Mailbox: 09.07.18 : The Other McCain

  11. Andy in FL

    It would be interesting if someone did a study which assumes the 19th Amendment had never passed. Go back and subtract all the female votes from the election results from all levels of federal elections. Hello presidents Dewey and Landon? 10% across the board tax rates? Zero federal social welfare programs? No corporate taxes? The US and allies force the Red Army out of Poland and Eastern Europe? No communist takeover in China? Obama would on his 8th term as a city council member in Chicago?

    Like

    1. Luke

      Re the study where the 19th Amendment had hypothetically never been passed: I believe it has been done, at least WRT U.S. Presidential elections. Hint: no JFK, no Jimmy Carter, no Bill Clinton, and no Obama, at the very least.

      Like

    2. CriticalThought

      You could start with John Lott and Lawrence Kenny’s “Did Women’s Suffrage Change the Size and Scope of Government?” at “http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~iversen/PDFfiles/LottKenny.pdf

      Spoiler: Yes.
      Suffrage coincided with immediate increases in state government
      expenditures and revenue and more liberal voting patterns
      for federal representatives, and these effects continued growing
      over time as more women took advantage of the franchise. Contrary
      to many recent suggestions, the gender gap is not something
      that has arisen since the 1970s, and it helps explain why American
      government started growing when it did.

      Like

  12. CriticalThought

    Men in banking need to be more sensitive to this – and to stop crowing about their children and expecting childless female colleagues to pick up the slack when they start dumping work on them and taking extra time off.

    Wow, she’s achieved Equality. She’s complaining about men in banking doing what women in all businesses do – working less to address family concerns.

    Maternity Leave: good.

    Fathers Trying for Work/Life balance: bad,

    Like

    1. Nick Mgtow

      CriticalThought

      Maternity Leave: good.

      Fathers Trying for Work/Life balance: bad,

      yeah, all those advantages, privileges I mean, are made for wymyn, not men!

      Like

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